Mercado Kitchen: Mexican Style Grilled Corn

With this heatwave going through the city, we wanted to share the recipe of one of our summer favorites: elote asado or Mexican style grilled corn. You could use store bought mayonnaise for this recipe, but I find that the Read more

Mercado Kitchen: Corn, Avocado, and Tomato Salad

This super easy and quick recipe can be summed up in one word: summer. As you have probably already guessed from the title, the main cast in this colorful salad are tomatoes, corn, and avocado. Tomatoes are at their peak Read more

More Than a Vendor

Sure, we know who has our favorite pluots or who bakes a mean vegan brownie, but every vendor has their own story. Sometimes it's difficult to imagine these people outside of the market setting, but many of our vendors Read more

Spotted at MCM: Three Babes Bakeshop

Posted on by Carletta Wong in Blog, Blue House Farm, Happy Boy Farms, Jarred SF Brine, Marla Bakery, Spotted at MCM, Yerena Farms | Leave a comment

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The sassy duo behind the organic, seasonal pies from Three Babes Bakeshop were spotted shopping at the market last Thursday. They picked up delicious berries from Yerena Farms (above) and sugar pie pumpkins from Blue House Farm (below).

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Anna and Lenore can be found shopping at Mission Community Market every week – both for their pie business and to buy groceries for their apartment. They love that they get to see many of their friends from the SF food community there. They have been buying fruit from Poli and Sylvia Yerena since they launched their business, and are so impressed with Yerena Farms’ delicious berries all year round that they usually source all their berries from them. Lenore used to snack on berries meant for their pies, so now they have a rule that every Thursday she comes to MCM and buys her own personal flat of berries so that she can eat as many as she wants! Some of their other favorites at the market include tasty loaves of bread and delicious cookies from Marla Bakery, veggies from Happy Boy Farms, and pickles from Jarred SF Brine.

The berries and pumpkins Three Babes procured at the market are seasonal fillings for their amazingly flakey pie crust. Two of their favorite fall pies are pluot blackberry and pear raspberry.

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With Thanksgiving around the corner, sugar pie pumpkin is very popular. They split and roast the sugar pie pumpkins and then scoop out and puree the flesh to make tasty pumpkin pies. While summer is their favorite season for pie fillings, fall is a close second with sugar pie pumpkins being at the top of their list!

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You can order pies online from Three Babes Bakeshop or through Good Eggs. Get your Thanksgiving orders in and you might enjoy some Mission Community Market produce in your holiday pie this year! The babes can also be found selling their pies at the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market on Saturdays.

Photos courtesy of Three Babes Bakeshop

Mercado Kitchen: Chard Sausage Stuffing

Posted on by Carletta Wong in 4505 Meats, Arizmendi Bakery, Blog, Blue House Farm, Far West Fungi, Happy Boy Farms, Mercado Kitchen, Recipes, Winters Tree Fruit | Leave a comment

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This flavorful chard sausage stuffing makes a hearty side dish at your Thanksgiving table. And it’s chock full of amazing ingredients from the market! Like tasty bread from Arizmendi Bakery, sweet and savory chicken apple calvados sausage from 4505 Meats, robust pioppini mushrooms from Far West Fungi, and toasty walnuts from Winters Fruit Tree. Plus look for fresh produce for this dish – swiss chard, leeks, garlic, and herbs – at Blue House Farm and Happy Boy Farms.

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This recipe comes together easily and can even be assembled up to a day in advance to save you prep time on Turkey day. It would also work great to bring to a potluck Thanksgiving. So shop at the market this week (your last chance before Thanksgiving!) and try making a new side dish this year.

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Chard Sausage Stuffing

Adapted from a Sunset Magazine recipe

Ingredients:

1/2 lb crusty bread (we used a sourdough baguette from Arizmendi Bakery)

1 c milk

1 lb sausage (we used 1 package of chicken apple calvados from 4505 Meats)

2 small leeks, thinly sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 c fresh parsley, chopped

2 c mushrooms (we used pioppini from Far West Fungi)

1 bunch Swiss chard, stems trimmed, coarsely chopped

1/2 c grated parmesan cheese

1 t dried basil (or one handful fresh basil, roughly chopped)

1/4 t dried sage (or approximately 10 fresh sage leaves, chopped)

1/2 c walnuts, toasted and roughly chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Cut bread into 1/2-in. slices and place in a large bowl with the milk. Mix gently to saturate with milk and let stand about 30 minutes. Stir occasionally.

Slice the sausages into disks and sauté over medium high heat in a large pot, until lightly browned. Add leeks and sauté until slightly wilted. Add garlic, parsley, and mushrooms. Cook, stirring often, until vegetables are lightly browned, 5 to 8 minutes. Add chard and 1/3 cup water and cook, stirring often, until wilted, about 5 minutes.

Squeeze the soaked bread with your hands and break into tiny pieces. Add the cooked meat mixture, parmesan, basil, sage, and walnuts. Stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to an 8×8 inch casserole dish. For moist stuffing, cover with foil. For crusty stuffing, do not cover. Bake until hot (at least 150 degrees in center) or lightly browned, at least 30 minutes.

Tips for making in advance: you can make the stuffing, put in the casserole dish and chill up to 1 day in advance. Allow about 1 hour to bake.

Stuffing photos by Carletta Wong

Mercado Kitchen: Chiles Rellenos Casserole

Posted on by Carletta Wong in Achadinha Cheese Company, Blog, Blue House Farm, Great Valley Poultry, Happy Boy Farms, Mercado Kitchen, Recipes | Leave a comment

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The abundance of peppers at the market comes in many shapes, sizes, colors, and flavors. Don’t miss out as pepper season winds down! Blue House Farm and Happy Boy Farms tell us there are only about two to three weeks of peppers left.

Wondering what to do with all these wonderful peppers? Chiles rellenos are a traditional Mexican dish that translates as “stuffed chiles” – typically a roasted poblano pepper stuffed with cheese, fried in egg batter, and served over tomato sauce. This casserole is an easier version that’s also healthier because it’s baked instead of fried.

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This casserole features a variety of peppers that can be found at the market – red shishito peppers from Happy Boy Farms and round of Hungary, poblano, and lipstick peppers from Blue House Farm. A layer of tomato sauce made with heirloom tomatoes from Happy Boy Farms and laced with red shishito and round of Hungary peppers is topped with poblano and lipstick peppers stuffed with cotija and monterey jack cheeses. The casserole is then topped with an egg-flour mixture featuring eggs from Great Valley Poultry and baked to perfection. The peppers can be stuffed with cheeses of your choice – for an extra kick try the Hot Hilda fresh cheese curds from Achadinha Cheese Company flavored with cayenne and red chili!

The full recipe is after the jump. ¡Buen provecho!  Read more

Know your Peppers with Happy Boy Farm

Posted on by EmilyN in Blog, Happy Boy Farms, Mercado Kitchen | Leave a comment

When I asked Ash of Happy Boy Farm to talk to me about the difference between Padrón and Shishito Peppers, she exclaimed, “Well, for starters, they come from two totally different parts of the world!”

To the naked (and uninformed) eye, baskets of these two small green peppers often found at MCM this time of year might appear indistinguishable. But guess what–they each have quite a story to tell, with properties that make them unique. I decided to delve into the history behind these two fraternal twin peppers a little more to find out what makes makes them special.

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Padrón Peppers

The most famous produce of the Spanish city Padrón are its peppers. Franciscan monks first brought pepper seeds to the area from Mexico in the 16th century, which then were adapted to the soil and climate of the area.

Most of the peppers taste sweet and mild–like tiny bell peppers–though some are particularly hot and spicy, which can give some special character to a dish prepared with these little guys. The popular Spanish saying,“Os pementos de Padrón, uns pican e outros non” meaning “Padrón peppers, some are hot and some are not” captures this sentiment perfectly. Although it’s not always the case, some have found that the peppers grown later in the season (towards August and September) tend to contain more capsaicin–and thus are spicier–than the grown in June and July. A couple sources I found said that about one in every 20 peppers will be hot, and the rest will be mild. However, sometimes you’ll get a basket with a slightly higher ratio. It really is a game of spicy roulette when you eat these peppers!

Shishitos on the other hand, come from Japan, halfway around the world, as Ash told me.

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Shishito Peppers

 The Shishito pepper is small and finger-sized, slender, and thin-walled. The name refers to the fact that the tip of the chili pepper looks like the head of a lion (“shisho”) and in Japanese it is often abbreviated as Shishitō.

Though apparently some varieties of Shishitos do form capsaicin and become spicy, Ash assured me that I wouldn’t find a spicy pepper in my basket–and I didn’t. The peppers generally become spicy in hot, dry conditions, and we won’t often get such weather here. According to Ash, Shishitos are also more “buttery” than their Padrón counterparts.

The easiest way to tell them apart is the fact that the Shishitos are usually more slender and wrinkly, while Padróns tend to be fatter, and have an appearance more similar to Jalapeños.

Lucky for us, both varieties of peppers cook up easily and with much the same simple preparation–toss them in a glass baking dish with some olive oil, coarse salt, and black pepper, and bake for about 20-25 minutes at 350 ° F until slightly browned in parts. It doesn’t get much easier than that! I like to sprinkle them with some goat cheese or feta if I have it on hand.

Enjoy the rest of our San Francisco summer, and happy pepper picking!

Jarred Spring Garlic Dressing w/ Roasted Potatoes & Peppers

Posted on by Dana Crary in Blog, Blue House Farm, Happy Boy Farms, Jarred SF Brine, La Cocina, Mercado Kitchen, Recipes | 1 Comment

Photos taken by Daniel Sullivan Jr. Instagram: @dsulliphoto

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Emiliana Puyana from Jarred SF Brine aims to positively impact the world through tasty, crunchy pickles. After growing up in Venezuela, Emiliana pursued her love of food by attending the Culinary Institute of America in New York. Now she has created Jarred SF Brine, a pickle business that operates out of La Cocina using local and sustainable fruits and vegetables picked at the peak of their seasons.

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Before talking with Emiliana, we didn’t know much about cooking with pickles. Pickles are usually eaten straight out of the jar, right? Thankfully Emiliana has a wealth of knowledge about easy ways to pep up everything from salads to cocktails using her delicious creations. She offered the inspiration for this recipe and has many more ideas to give. Check out the recipe page of her website, or better yet, stop by her stand at MCM this thursday to taste her pickles and ask for some inspiration on how to cook with them.

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This Pickled Spring Garlic Dressing recipe can be used in endless ways–try it as a seafood marinade or for dipping artichokes. We decided to roast Fingerling Potatoes from Happy Boy Farms thanks to their buttery texture and thin skin which doesn’t need to be peeled. For a little smokey spice, we added Padron Peppers from Blue House Farm. You can find the full recipe after the jump.  Read more